As I Saw Bhagavan Ramana: By Varanasi Subbalakshmi

A most beautiful account by Varanasi Subbalakshami of Bhagavan Ramana. Bhagavan Devotees will enjoy reading it immensely.

I LOST MY HUSBAND when I was sixteen. I went back to my mother’s house and lived there as a widow should, trying to pray to and meditate on God. My mother’s mind too was devoted to the spiritual quest and religion was the main thing in her life. Continue reading

Remembering Bhagavan Ramana: By Krishna Bhikshu

I went to Arunachala for the first time with Sri Rami Reddi. We had our food in the town and then went to the Ashrama. In those days there was very little there – a hut for Bhagavan and another over his mother’s samadhi (place of burial). Bhagavan had just finished his food and was washing his hands. He looked at us intently. “Did you have your food?” He asked. “Yes, we had it in town.” “You could have had it here,” he replied.

I stayed with him for three days. He made a great impression on me. I considered him to be a real Mahatma, although his ways were very simple. Most of the cooking was done by him in those days. The Ashrama lived from hand to mouth and usually only rice and vegetable soup were prepared.

When I was about to leave, I asked Bhagavan: “Bhagavan, kindly show me a good path.” “What are you doing now?” he asked. “When I am in the right mood, I sing the songs of Tyagaraja and I recite the holy Gayatri. I was also doing some pranayama but these breathing exercises have upset my health.”

Bhagavan said, “You had better stop them. But never give up the Advaita Dristhi (non dual vision).” At that time I could not understand his words. Continue reading

The Obstacle Is In The Mind. Comments on Sri Ramana By Dr. Harsh K. Luthar

Once Sri Ramana was asked, “How does a grihastha (householder) fare in the scheme of Moksha (liberation)?” The Maharshi said, “The obstacle is the mind. It must be got over whether at home or in the forest. Renunciation is always in the mind, not in going to the forest or solitary places, or giving up one’s duties. The main thing is to see that the mind does not turn outward but inward.” (Talk 54). Continue reading