As I Saw Him: By Sadhu Arunachala

As I Saw Him….

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The most authentic sources for Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi’s teaching are Bhagavan’s own words and also the recollections of Bhagavan devotees. How Bhagavan spoke and acted in the world also is noteworthy as the purest teachings of the Self emanated from his very being.  I will be sharing some of my favorite stories of Bhagavan as told by the devotees.

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As I Saw Bhagavan Ramana: By Varanasi Subbalakshmi

As I saw Bhagavan Ramana

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A most beautiful account by Varanasi Subbalakshami of Bhagavan Ramana. Bhagavan Devotees will enjoy reading it immensely.

I LOST MY HUSBAND when I was sixteen. I went back to my mother’s house and lived there as a widow should, trying to pray to and meditate on God. My mother’s mind too was devoted to the spiritual quest and religion was the main thing in her life.

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Remembering Bhagavan Ramana: By Krishna Bhikshu

As I Saw Him: By Krishna Bhikshu

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I went to Arunachala for the first time with Sri Rami Reddi. We had our food in the town and then went to the Ashrama. In those days there was very little there – a hut for Bhagavan and another over his mother’s samadhi (place of burial). Bhagavan had just finished his food and was washing his hands. He looked at us intently. “Did you have your food?” He asked. “Yes, we had it in town.” “You could have had it here,” he replied.

I stayed with him for three days. He made a great impression on me. I considered him to be a real Mahatma, although his ways were very simple. Most of the cooking was done by him in those days. The Ashrama lived from hand to mouth and usually only rice and vegetable soup were prepared.

When I was about to leave, I asked Bhagavan: “Bhagavan…

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Know That By Which All Else Is Known: By Dr. Harsh K. Luthar

Know That by which all else is known.

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First set yourself rightThe photo art above is from John Wassenberg FB page.
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Some say that Reality is subjective, some say it is objective, and some say it is both objective and subjective, and some say it is neither.

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Kundalini Shakti in the West: By Dr. Harsh K. Luthar

Kundalini Yoga in the West

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The notion of Kundalini Shakti is at the heart of yoga and is embedded in virtually all Eastern traditions regardless of the name or label that is given. If we carefully examine any school of yoga, tantra, or various traditions (Shakti, Shaivite, Kashmiri Shaivism), there will usually be some descriptions of Hatha Yoga, Pranayama, Kriyas, Mudras, Mantras, and different types of meditations on the Chakras (energy centers).

In the Shakti traditions, detailed descriptions are given of the various aspects of the visions of the Goddess that arise in meditation. Even in the school of Advaita Vedanta, which does not depend on the practices associated with Shakti Yoga, we see that the great scholar/saint Adi Shankracharya has written hymns to the Goddess who represents Shakti, the divine power.

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Goddess As The Guru In Tripura Rahasya

Goddess As The Guru

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Sri Sri Anandmayi Ma

The classic Goddess scripture Tripura Rahasaya is well known to Sanskrit scholars and now a number of translations exist in English.

Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi often quoted from Tripura Rahasya and considered it one of the greatest works that expounded Advaita philosophy. Bhagavan’s close devotee Munagala Venkataramaiah (later known as Swami Ramanananda Saraswathi)  translated Tripura Rahasya into English in 1936. That was the first translation of this classic, I believe. A number of Sanskrt scholars since then have made their own translations into English.

In many Hindu scriptures like Tripura Rahasaya, the ultimate Guru is Devi, the Supreme Goddess.  She gives instructions to the sages so they can know the highest truth of Reality and attain Self-Realization.

In the path of Tantra, the sciences explaining the mystery of mantra, mind, and breath are explored and explained. Tantric texts focus on the nature of the divine energy within the body, also…

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Lovers Love Completely: The Goddess Mystery. By Dr. Harsh K. Luthar

The Goddess Mystery in the Yogic Tradition

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image

Picture of Arunachala by Gabriele Ebert

Song to the Goddess

Either let me be intoxicated
in your love completely
or put on my robes of joy
and rob me absolutely.
Judge me guilty
in the court of love
or absolve me absolutely;
find me flawed if you like
but never hold me weakly.
No middle ground is possible
for lovers who love completely!

Love, Consciousness, and Bliss

The great sage of Arunachala, Sri Ramana Maharshi, used to say that all deep thinking people are fascinated by the nature of consciousness. The outer world of time and space is known only through ones’ own mind. Therefore, the mystery of mind and consciousness has been a magnet of attraction for philosopher, yogis, sages, and scientists. Upanishads say that one should know “That” by which all else is known.

What is “That”, which makes all else visible and known? The ancient philosophy outlined…

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